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Canadian Forces Combat Camera

Rating: 4.80 - Votes: 5 - Views: 2017
Added by: lostfound30, 08-11-2012
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Description
HMCS Victoria (SSK 876) conducts a live fire sink exercise on the decommissioned USNS Concord at the Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands.

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08-15-2014, 03:56 AM #86274
   
louielopez
Corporal

USS Concord AFS-5, was a Combat Stores Ship, part of the Auxiliary Fleet of the US Navy. Auxiliary ships were attached to Service Squadrons back when I was in 30+ years ago. She was decommisioned in '92 i believe, and transferred to Military Sealift Command, then redesighated USNS Concord, TAFS-5. (Note the changes). Remarkably, she served up to 2009 when she was deactivated. Basically, she carried everything but bullets. (That was the job of the Ammo Ships (AE's), and Fast Combat Supply Ships (AOE's).
he was sunk here, in 15,000 ft of blue Pacific, by one Mk-48 torpedo. Keep in mind, we had 48's when I was in, they were then classified, (maybe still are), and were our latest generation of torpedo. Even then , they were a smart weapon.
What you are seeing here, is a hit to the bow area, right around Cargo Hold 1. The occupied areas of the ship had full watertight compartments, but the holds were pretty much wide open. Meaning the top of the compartment is indeed accessed via watertight hatch, but the elevator openings are open. The only closures are aluminum "J"doors They slide together but w/ no seals, and steel roller curtains at the weather deck. If you cause the hull to collapse from the explosion, you would fill the cargo hold, but ships crew will have set watertight integrity. She won't sink just because one or 2 holds are filled. But she was set for sinking. Burners would have cut holes between holds on the lower levels, hatches removed to allow for filling w/ seawater and venting air as she fills. So yeah, she went quicker than a similar hit under battle conditions. (At General Quarters, all watertight hatches are kept dogged shut). note the rust cloud you see as she is bow-down, sliding towards the seafloor. That's the venting, because they wanted her to sink.
What you saw if you watched the clip of USNS Kilauea, TAE-26 being hit, the torpedo struck right at the rear bulkhead of Hold #4, dead midship, and the pressure bubble lifted the ship and broke the keel. She split in two. Woulda been an immediate total loss, quite probably breaking the main bulkhead between the cargo hold and the main engineroom, giving the crew very little time to abandon and get the Mk-5 life rafts deployed. In otherwords- screwed. I rode a Flint class AE for over 4yrs, so I know Kilauea's intimately. overall design almost exactly that of Flint class, of which the Mt. Baker AE-34 belonged to.
   
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09-02-2012, 08:09 PM #60411
CanuckSailor    
CanuckSailor
Private

Amazing what one shot can do!
   
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08-13-2012, 08:34 PM #57778
ItalianStallion    
ItalianStallion
Sergeant

Direct hit
   
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08-12-2012, 02:27 AM #57562
   
finack
Warrant Officer

Wow. That was a huge explosion.

Kiwi68, I don't know anything about ships or torpedo's, but I'm sure plenty of sailors on this site can give you the facts.

The time stamps in the upper left hand corner tell all though.
@ 01:55:10 she's hit.
@ 01:55:24 the water geyser created by the explosion finally settles back to sea level. <--- 14 secs tells me that was a monster explosion.
@ 02:02:43 it appears the whole bow upto almost the middle of the ship shows water even with deck. <--- excuse my ignorant ship terms. Anyways, that's just under 7mins. I'm assuming they have ways of mitigating further flooding to other parts of the ship after such an attack. <--- Sailors, please do tell if you could. I've always been curious about this. Especially after watching some of the horrific WWII Pacific theater footage. How some of those ships stayed afloat was mesmerizing.

So if this was a real attack kiwi68, I would think it would have been hit more than once. I think the sailors on board would've had a huge challenge to overcome to save this ship. Either way, that would be some scary shit to deal with, especially if you're in known shark infested waters.

You also mentioned how torpedoes are suppose to work. I'm curious about that as well. After watching another video on AC recently, it showed what you were talking about. It seemed like it blew up under the middle of the ship and the air bubbles lifted it out of the water causing the ship to break via its own weight out of water. That was very interesting. Always thought they were just meant to penetrate and blow up inside the ship.
   
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08-12-2012, 01:00 AM #57559
kiwi68    
kiwi68
Corporal

I thought that modern torpedos where designed to detonte under the idle of a ship, so that the back of the ship was broken. if this was a real attack that ship would most likely could have survied.

Or am I wrong. ??
   
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08-11-2012, 03:35 PM #57531
Kurticus    
Kurticus
Corporal

Down she goes....
   
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08-11-2012, 10:46 AM #57502
ErisKillton    
ErisKillton

You sunk my battleship!
   
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08-11-2012, 09:15 AM #57493
lostfound30    
lostfound30
Sergeant

Somthing you dont see everyday
   
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