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Dr. Edgerton 1 billionth a second photos of nuclear bombs
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Added by: LetsTripOutAndDie, 09-03-2014
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Atomic bomb explosion photographed by Edgerton and his colleagues at EG&G, likely at the Nevada Proving Grounds, on commission for the Atomic Energy Commission; circa 1952. Revealing the incredible anatomy of the first microseconds of an atomic explosion, the fireball was documented in a 1/100,000,000-of-a-second exposure, taken from seven miles away with a lens ten feet long. The terrifying explosion caused lightning-like energy to descend the guide wires of the tower. (see "Stopping Time" (1987), p. 145). (CC)

HEE-NC-52010

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