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EXTREMLY GRAPHC - Iraq Operation Phantom Fury

Rating: 4.76 - Votes: 21 - Views: 18796
Added by: Stark, 08-04-2012
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Description
EXTREMELY GRAPHIC IMAGES: VIOLENCE, WOUNDED SOLDIERS AND DEAD BODIES.
In The Things They Cannot Say, eleven soldiers and Marines display a rare courage that transcends battlefield heroics -- they share the truth about their wars. For each of them it means something different: one struggles to recover from a head injury he believes has stolen his ability to love, another attempts to make amends for the killing of an innocent man, while yet another finds respect for the enemy fighter who tried to kill him. Award-winning journalist and author Kevin Sites asks the difficult questions of these combatants, many of whom he first met while in Afghanistan and Iraq and others he sought out from different wars: What is it like to kill? What is it like to be under fire? How do you know what's right? What can you never forget?Sites compiles the accounts of soldiers, Marines, their families and friends, and also shares the unsettling narrative of his own failures during war (including complicity in a murder) and the redemptive powers of storytelling in arresting a spiraling path of self-destruction.He learns that war both gives and takes from those most intimately involved in it. Some struggle in perpetual disequilibrium, while others find balance, usually with the help of communities who have learned to listen, without judgment, to the real stories of the men and women it has sent to fight its battles.Kevin Sites has spent the past decade reporting on global war and disaster for ABC, NBC, CNN, and Yahoo! News. In 2005, he became Yahoo!'s first correspondent and covered every major conflict in the world in a single year for his website, "Kevin Sites in the Hot Zone." He is a recipient of the 2006 Daniel Pearl Award for Courage and Integrity in Journalism and was chosen as a Harvard University Nieman Journalism Fellow in 2010.

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01-02-2015, 03:18 PM #87791
Fyall    
Fyall
Corporal

Rest easy Devil Dog. May you and your family find peace.
   
  1. Likes

03-09-2013, 04:14 AM #71305
LetsTripOutAndDie    
LetsTripOutAndDie
First Lieutenant

Salute Wold. You may finally Rest In Peace.
   
  1. Likes

11-28-2012, 11:30 PM #67066
   
recon1968
Corporal

Marine's death ruled an accident
Military - Sgt. William Wold's parents question the results of an autopsy that blamed medication
Friday, February 02, 2007
DEE ANNE FINKEN
The Oregonian

The death of a 23-year-old Marine from Camas, Wash., in early November was an accident, according to the San Diego County medical examiner, but the sergeant's parents say the report prompts more questions than answers, including whether the military properly treated him.

"How can they justify this as an accident? And whose accident is it?" said Sandra Wold, the mother of Sgt. William C. Wold. His body was found in his San Diego bunk three days after his discharge from a military hospital. He was at the facility to be treated for post-traumatic stress disorder that his family said caused a drug addiction.

In a report dated Jan. 8, the medical examiner concluded Wold's death was "best listed as methadone, clonazepam, diazepam, and fluoxetine toxicity."

Two friends discovered the Marine in his bed at barracks affiliated with the Balboa Naval Medical Center. The night before, the three had gone out for tattoos and returned to Wold's quarters to eat fast food and watch a movie.

Sandra Wold of Camas said her son had not been prescribed methadone at the time of his death. But he had been prescribed the anti-addiction drug along with the three other medications during hospitalizations two months earlier at California military facilities at Camp Pendleton and in Palo Alto.

"Those were not lethal drugs at Camp Pendleton, and they were in the same combination," Wold said Thursday in a phone interview. "How can that be?"

Marines public affairs officers at Camp Pendleton, where William Wold had been stationed, declined to comment, saying details weren't immediately available.

Wold, who was buried Nov. 17 in Evergreen Memorial Gardens in Vancouver, enlisted in the Marines at 17 and was selected to guard President Bush for three years at Camp David before going to Iraq in 2004. In fighting in Fallujah that year, he suffered a blast injury.

His mother said the war also severely affected her son emotionally and psychologically, and that led to his drug problem.

One incident he found particularly tough to forget involved a vehicle running a roadblock. Directed to fire as the vehicle came through the roadblock, the troops later discovered the van had been filled with children. The incident left Wold unable to sleep, eat or be among crowds.

He re-enlisted, his mother said, hoping to find solace in the company of others in the military. But, according to official records, he was unable to complete a substance abuse program and was being readied for military discharge when he was moved from the naval hospital to the barracks.

The Department of the Navy has said it is performing a criminal investigation into Wold's death, but it is not complete.
   
  1. Likes

11-28-2012, 11:04 PM #67064
   
recon1968
Corporal

Marine's death ruled an accident
Military - Sgt. William Wold's parents question the results of an autopsy that blamed medication
Friday, February 02, 2007
DEE ANNE FINKEN
The Oregonian

The death of a 23-year-old Marine from Camas, Wash., in early November was an accident, according to the San Diego County medical examiner, but the sergeant's parents say the report prompts more questions than answers, including whether the military properly treated him.

"How can they justify this as an accident? And whose accident is it?" said Sandra Wold, the mother of Sgt. William C. Wold. His body was found in his San Diego bunk three days after his discharge from a military hospital. He was at the facility to be treated for post-traumatic stress disorder that his family said caused a drug addiction.

In a report dated Jan. 8, the medical examiner concluded Wold's death was "best listed as methadone, clonazepam, diazepam, and fluoxetine toxicity."

Two friends discovered the Marine in his bed at barracks affiliated with the Balboa Naval Medical Center. The night before, the three had gone out for tattoos and returned to Wold's quarters to eat fast food and watch a movie.

Sandra Wold of Camas said her son had not been prescribed methadone at the time of his death. But he had been prescribed the anti-addiction drug along with the three other medications during hospitalizations two months earlier at California military facilities at Camp Pendleton and in Palo Alto.

"Those were not lethal drugs at Camp Pendleton, and they were in the same combination," Wold said Thursday in a phone interview. "How can that be?"

Marines public affairs officers at Camp Pendleton, where William Wold had been stationed, declined to comment, saying details weren't immediately available.

Wold, who was buried Nov. 17 in Evergreen Memorial Gardens in Vancouver, enlisted in the Marines at 17 and was selected to guard President Bush for three years at Camp David before going to Iraq in 2004. In fighting in Fallujah that year, he suffered a blast injury.

His mother said the war also severely affected her son emotionally and psychologically, and that led to his drug problem.

One incident he found particularly tough to forget involved a vehicle running a roadblock. Directed to fire as the vehicle came through the roadblock, the troops later discovered the van had been filled with children. The incident left Wold unable to sleep, eat or be among crowds.

He re-enlisted, his mother said, hoping to find solace in the company of others in the military. But, according to official records, he was unable to complete a substance abuse program and was being readied for military discharge when he was moved from the naval hospital to the barracks.

The Department of the Navy has said it is performing a criminal investigation into Wold's death, but it is not complete.
   
  1. Likes

11-13-2012, 05:13 PM #66610
cilerc    
cilerc
Sergeant

24:41 well said, rest in peace wold
   
  1. Likes

10-01-2012, 07:09 PM #63347
Clodius    
Clodius
Warrant Officer

http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-40968.html
   
  1. Likes

09-29-2012, 11:13 AM #63071
whiteraven    
whiteraven
Corporal

I have lost count of how many times I have watched this. RIP L. Corporal Wold. Very Brave Men indeed.
   
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08-17-2012, 02:23 PM #58299
   
pinhead1376
Corporal

Father is murdered, 4 good friends die, and killed 12 enemy. All before age 21. I don't care who you are. That will change you for the worst. Rest in peace.
   
  1. Likes

08-07-2012, 04:50 PM #56948
   
Donkeypunch0420
Private

Looks like L. Corporal Wold may have been KIA on his second tour.

http://timeofremembrance.org/wold.aspx

Rest in peace Marine. Thank you for your sacrifice.
   
  1. Likes

08-07-2012, 03:15 PM #56925
   
hadrian1
Private First Class

http://timeofremembrance.org/wold.aspx
   
  1. Likes

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